Marijuana may be legal in California, but it’s still not allowed at Coachella

Smoking marijuana is legal in California, just don’t expect to do it at Coachella.

Despite state law allowing for the possession of certain amounts of marijuana and the consumption of it at one’s home, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival has banned marijuana and marijuana products at the concert this spring in Indio, according to the policy set by concert promoter Goldenvoice.

Concertgoers can, however, place marijuana or any other drugs they might have in “amnesty boxes” located at the entrances, the Press-Enterprise reported.

Coachella has never allowed marijuana on festival grounds, but some may have expected that policy to change after California joined several other states in legalizing recreational marijuana last year.

The law, which took effect Jan. 1, says adults 21 years old and over can have, use and give away up to one ounce of pot, and cultivate no more than six plants for personal use on private property.

Indio police Sgt. Dan Marshall told the Press-Enterprise that while the concert is being held on private property, the promoter has a “standing right to the property,” and can “determine what can and cannot be brought onto the premises.”

“(For instance) you have the right to bear arms, but you don’t have the right to bear arms in my house,” he told the publication.

The law also allows local governments to restrict or ban cannabis businesses in their jurisdiction. Under Indio laws, no one can sell, manufacture, test, process or grow pot in the city, even for medical use, The Desert Sun reported.

The concert set to happen April 13-15 and April 20-22 at Indio's Empire Polo Club will feature performances from Beyonce, Eminem and the Weeknd, as well as SZA and Cardi B.

Coachella’s policy prohibiting marijuana doesn’t seem to have deterred concertgoers. The festival sold out in just a few hours, Digital Music News reported.